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Central Florida’s Version of Winter is Upon Us

What’s going on in the Woods of the Wekiva? January, 2016 edition

Central Florida’s version of winter is upon us. Like the other seasons, there are plenty of signs that winter is here, but this winter is not necessarily evident in colder temperatures and low humidity with no precipitation. In fact, we have mostly experienced just the opposite during this winter.

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25th Annual Wekiva Christmas Bird Count, Saturday December 19th

What’s going on in the Woods of the Wekiva? November, 2015 edition

25th Annual Wekiva Christmas Bird Count, Saturday December 19th – I’m going to devote the next two monthly articles to the Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC). For this month, a little history and some encouragement for everyone interested in the natural environment in the Wekiva basin to participate in this year’s count. Next month, I will summarize some of the details of the Wekiva CBC – scheduled for Saturday December 19th.

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Yes, there is a fall season in Florida

What’s going on in the Woods of the Wekiva? October, 2015 edition

Yes Irene, there is a fall season in Florida. Every year, my wife, Irene and I debate whether there is actually a fall season in Florida or whether it is mythical or a delusional state that I solely enjoy. Here in late October we are finally enjoying a break in temperature, and a slow-down in thundershowers and rainy afternoons that accompany summer weather patterns. However, for some people, cooling down to a daytime high of only 86° does not constitute a fall season. So, I have compiled a list of changes that are occurring that I hope will be a compelling argument for the wonderful nuances of fall in central Florida. For example:

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Summer rains and wetland hydrology

What’s going on in the Woods of the Wekiva? September, 2015 edition

Summer rains and wetland hydrology – Over the last 2 to 3 months we’ve had expected deluges from summer rains and weather patterns associated with tropical storms. One group of vertebrates that particularly “anticipates” the relatively regular rains of Florida summers are the Anurans – the taxonomic Order that includes frogs and toads. I’m fond of spending early evenings near marshes and swamps listening to the calls of various species of frogs and toads.

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Adaptable Species

What’s going on in the Woods of the Wekiva? July edition

Adaptable Species

Somewhat of an abbreviated article this month… In part this is because I have spent two of the last four weeks in other regions of the country. I can tell you more about what’s going on in the woods in Sequoia National Forest right now than in the Wekiva Basin. Which leads me to this month’s ecological tidbit. Read More…

Biological Diversity: Landscape Level Influences

What’s going on in the Woods of the Wekiva? Early June addition

Biological Diversity: Landscape Level Influences

Last month’s walk through the Seminole State Forest caused me to reflect on the exceptional biological diversity in the Wekiva Basin. This diversity is influenced by the assemblage of various distinctive habitats and the plethora of organisms that are adapted to each one. Some of these can persist for millennia unaffected by the conditions of habitat surrounding them. More often than not though, landscape-level or regional influences affect plants and animals – even those that have relatively small home range or habitat needs. Read More…

Biological Diversity: Habitat Influences

What’s going on in the Woods of the Wekiva? Early May addition.

Biological Diversity: Habitat Influences

I recently hiked a stretch of the Florida Scenic Trail that traverses through the Seminole State Forest north of State Road 46 in the Wekiva Basin. Because it is such an energetic time of year – birds are singing, reptiles and amphibians are active, and plants are flowering and fruiting – the differences in each natural community I travelled through was clearly evident. Read More…

Wekiva Basin Swamps

What’s going on in the Woods of the Wekiva?: Early April addition. Seasonal changes do occur in the natural systems of central Florida. Keeping track of those subtle changes can give us insight into the ecology and natural processes that influence the plants and animals in the basin. Let’s see what’s going on right now… Read More…